The first experiment that I did with my accelerometer was with my mom driving in a car. While she was driving, I held the accelerometer and noticed different things during the drive. When the car was at rest, the cork was in the middle of the bottle. When the car started to accelerate forward, the cork leaned toward the direction the car was moving. Once we got to a constant speed, the cork returned to the middle of the bottle because when there is just a constant velocity, and no acceleration, the cork will remain floating in the middle of the bottle of water. When the car made a turn, the cork leaned toward the direction we were moving. When the car stopped, the cork leaned towards the back of the bottle because when a car stops, it accelerates backwards for a little bit. After the drive in the car, I concluded that the cork leans toward the side that accelerates. It does this because the cork and water are both at rest, but since the water has a greater mass, the cork is the object that moves.

The second experiment I did was jumping off of a chair while holding the accelerometer. Before I jumped off of the chair, the cork was obviously floating in the middle of the bottle because it was at rest. When I jumped off of the chair, the cork didn't change. It just stayed in the middle of the bottle when I jumped. This happened because the acceleration was downward and since the cork was tied to a string, the force of tension on the string wouldn't allow the cork to go down any further. If I jumped back up onto the chair, I would see the same result because the acceleration would be upward and since the cork is tied to a spring, I wouldn't see a change. The cork only leans during forward, backward, rightward, and leftward acceleration.